Category: Kitchen materials

Interior decor: why Antiqued Metallic glass is the ideal modern/traditional mix

Many of our customers love the look of traditional kitchens for their interior decor, but that’s not to say they want to replicate the Victorian experience entirely! While they might choose wooden dressers, butler’s sinks, decorative cornices and painted cupboards, it doesn’t mean they also want to forego the mod cons of the modern cooking environment. From wipe-clean surfaces to digital thermometers, app-controlled scales and even smart fridges that can order the shopping, they want to make the most of high-tech innovations that can save time and make their cooking, dining and cleaning experience so much easier.

For this reason, modern materials that fit right in with traditional interior decor are the holy grail of kitchen design for many people. From ceramic floor tiles that mimic natural stone, to polished nickel taps in traditional shapes, old-fashioned style combined with a practical finish is often the first choice for our customers. And when it comes to splashbacks, our Antiqued Metallic glass fits the bill perfectly. Made using an innovative layering technique that combines digital printing with metallic paint, the panels have stunning visual depth. This produces a traditional heritage-style appearance that resembles the granites, marbles and limestones of classic interiors but with a low-maintenance stain-resistant surface and a contemporary glossy finish.

If this sounds right for your interior decor scheme, here are the options we offer…

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Antique Mirror glass splashbacks produced for Domo Direct in Really Rough Antique Mirror

Kitchen design: our guide to choosing kitchen finishes

There are so many important things to consider with kitchen design, but one that often gets overlooked is whether or not the final combination of finishes work together. Beyond the kitchen materials themselves – wood, stone, glass, metal, etc – it’s important to consider whether you want matt, polished, reflective or special-effect finishes, or a combination of several different types. For instance, while you might decide on painted wooden cupboard doors, the paint itself could have a matt, eggshell or gloss finish. And a stone worktop could be highly polished, honed to a more subtle shine, or diamond brushed for an uneven leathery texture.

The most important consideration is the way in which these finishes will look within the room as a whole. It’s safest to mix them to create depth and interest and a variety of textures, but bear in mind that they need to complement rather than fight against each other. The style of kitchen design you’re aiming for is also significant – traditional kitchens often have matt units with polished worktops and hardware, whereas contemporary kitchens sometimes swap those finishes around. Minimalist kitchens, meanwhile, might eschew glossy surfaces completely and have natural wooden cabinets with honed stone worktops and stainless steel handles, while a futuristic kitchen might go full-on shiny.

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Coloured glass splashbacks produced for Wooden Heart Designers Guild in coastal retreat colour kitchen

The best materials for a low-maintenance kitchen

We all want a kitchen that looks stylish and welcoming as well as fresh and clean, but no one wants to spend hours every day preserving that appearance. Many kitchen materials, however, do require a lot of maintenance that sometimes causes buyers’ remorse. Stainless steel worktops, for instance, are very hard to keep smear and scratch free. Marble is porous and stains very easily. Granite requires special products and much time polishing and buffing to keep it looking clean and shiny. And tiles have grout lines that attract all manner of dirt, grime and mould. If you have better things to do than clean your kitchen all day long, look for materials that are: smooth with no cracks, crevices or unevenness; stain and water repellent; scratch and heat resistant; solid and durable; and offer a variety of patterns and finishes that won’t show every speck of dirt. A solid glass splashback, for instance, would tick all these boxes…

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